UKAS Accreditation – ISO Certification body accredited by UKAS (United Kingdom Accreditation Service)

Customer Testimonial Translink International Sales Limited

Translink International Sales Limited

Thank you to Neal Deller at Translink International Sales Limited for your feedback.

“The process was conducted in a professional manner taking into account the specific requirements of our business”.

Translink International Sales Limited are a supplier of Aerial Access Firefighting and Utility Equipment, who are based in Worcestershire. They have recently transitioned from ISO 9001:2008 to ISO 9001:2015 Certification.

Would You Like To Know More about ISO 9001:2015 Certification?

If you would like to know more about ISO 9001:2015 Certification, one of our team would be more than happy to assist you. We can be contacted on 01952 288325, you can initiate an online chat or complete our online enquiry form which can be found here.

Amanda Successfully Completes The CQI IRCA EMS ISO 14001:2015 Conversion Course

ISO 14001; ISO 14001:2015; Environmental, Interface, Interface NRM; Certification, Environmental Management System

 

Amanda Lakeland who is one of our Auditors here at Interface NRM, has now successfully completed the CQI IRCA EMS ISO 14001:2015 Conversion Course with Alcumus – well done Amanda!

This course is designed to equip existing auditors of other management system standards with the knowledge and skills required to perform audits of environmental management systems (EMS) against ISO 14001.

ISO 14001 is an internationally agreed standard that sets out the requirements for an environmental management system. It helps organisations improve their environmental performance through more efficient use of resources and reduction of waste, gaining a competitive advantage and the trust of stakeholders.

If you would like to know more about ISO 14001:2015 for your company, further information on this can be found on our website here. Alternatively, one of our dedicated staff would be more than happy to help with any questions you may have. You can call us on 01952 288325, initiate a live chat or complete our online enquiry form.

OHSAS 18001 Becoming an ISO Standard?

It keeps being reported that OHSAS 18001 is being turned into an ISO Standard, but we’ve yet to see anything materialise. The International Standards Organisation has been back-and-forth trying to create ISO 45001 from OHSAS 18001, but as yet, nothing is set in stone. So what’s gone on so far?

According to an update on the International Standardization Organisation’s website, the publication of ISO 45001, the new international audit Standard, expected to replace OHSAS 18001 Standard (occupational health and safety), has been extended again. The final publication is set to be released in December 2017, which is approximately 18 months later than the original planned release date of June 2016!

The Standard was originally delayed earlier in 2016 due to a huge number of comments received during a public consultation of the Standard. Over 3,000 comments were made regarding making changes to definitions of key concepts, and other minor changes which has set back the release date.

The original timetable reported the draft text would be finalised by October 2016, but this target has clearly been missed. Now there are reports that additional meetings are scheduled on 6th and 10th February 2017 in Austria. It’s looking likely that the Standard may not be published until October 2017 at the earliest, and the growing possibility is that it may not be released until early 2018.

FAQ’s About ISO 14001:2015

Some of our Frequently Asked Questions regarding the ISO 14001:2015 update

Who is it for?

This Standard is perfect for any SME, multi-sites and larger organisations, no matter the nature of the business.

What is it for?

The Standard helps organisations achieve industry regulated requirements to demonstrate to stakeholders that you consider the environment, and could give you more success when applying for tenders.

It also provides help on how to integrate the use of environmental performance evaluation techniques (EPE) and how to seamlessly merge Environmental Management Systems (EMS) with other compatible management systems, such as ISO 9001 Quality Management Systems (QMS).

This Standard is also very useful for multi-sites, as it provides a steady framework all sites can work to when implementing ISO 14001.

How can my business benefit?

The Standard can help your organisation develop, whilst still reducing the environmental impact of your organisational growth. It aids in enhancing your reputation with customers, stakeholders and the public, whilst also meeting regulatory Standards set by the industry, as well as local authorities and the government and assists you in the Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PPQ) stage when applying for tenders. For many industries, an up-to-date ISO 14001 certificate is a necessity to be considered for a tender.

How is this different to my ISO 14001:2004 Standard?

The Standard was updated to make sure it seamlessly provided continual help with your business processes, enabling you to save money and deal with the environmental challenges that lie ahead in the near future. Whilst it still maintains a phased approach when managing risk and legislation compliance, other phases and stages have been updated.

Read a more in-depth review of the ISO 14001:2015 update, and comparisons with the 2004 version of the Standard here.

ISO 14001:2015 is an internationally recognised Standard. If you have any questions or would like a free quote, call us today on 01952 288325 and talk to a member of our dedicated team or fill out our online enquiry form

How the Insurance Act 2015 Could Affect You

Guest post from Interface auditor Amanda Lakeland
One of the changes I have come across while auditing was the new Insurance Act 2015 which had to be implemented by August 2016.

(Following excerpts taken and modified from out-law.com, read the article in full here )

The 2015 Insurance Act (2015 Act) applies to all commercial contracts of insurance, and variations to existing contracts of insurance, from 12 August 2016 and introduces what the UK government has described as “the biggest reform to insurance contract law in more than a century”.

The Act introduces substantial changes to the laws governing disclosure in non-consumer insurance contracts; warranties and other contractual terms; and insurers’ remedies for fraudulent claims.

In the past, insured parties had to disclose every circumstance that they knew which would influence an insurer in fixing a premium or deciding if they should underwrite a risk. This required insured parties to predict, without much guidance, which factors may affect a prudent insurer. This was also true of brokers acting on behalf of insured parties.

Part 2 of the 2015 Insurance Act has created a new ‘duty of fair presentation’ aimed at encouraging active, rather than passive, engagement by insurers as well as clarifying and specifying known or presumed to be known matters. From 12 August 2015, before entering into a contract of insurance, insured parties must disclose either:

  • every matter which they know, or ought to know, that would influence the judgement of an insurer in deciding whether to insure the risk and on what terms (similar to the current legislation); or
  • sufficient information to put an insurer on notice that it needs to make further enquiries about potentially material circumstances.
  • Insured parties will be considered to have known, or ought to have known:
  • matters that could be expected to be revealed by a reasonable search of information available to the insured party – for example, information held within an organisation or by a broker;
  • anything known by a person responsible for their insurance – for example, a broker;
  • insured organisations will also be deemed to have the knowledge of anyone who is a part of the organisation’s senior management, or who is responsible for their insurance.
  • Insurers will be considered to have known, or ought to have known:
  • matters known to individuals who participate on behalf of the insurer in deciding whether to take the risk and on what terms – for example, underwriting teams;
  • knowledge held by the insurer and readily available to the person deciding whether to take the risk;
  • matters known by an employee or agent of the insurer and which should reasonably have been passed on to the person deciding whether to take the risk.