How the Insurance Act 2015 Could Affect You

Guest post from Interface auditor Amanda Lakeland
One of the changes I have come across while auditing was the new Insurance Act 2015 which had to be implemented by August 2016.

(Following excerpts taken and modified from out-law.com, read the article in full here )

The 2015 Insurance Act (2015 Act) applies to all commercial contracts of insurance, and variations to existing contracts of insurance, from 12 August 2016 and introduces what the UK government has described as “the biggest reform to insurance contract law in more than a century”.

The Act introduces substantial changes to the laws governing disclosure in non-consumer insurance contracts; warranties and other contractual terms; and insurers’ remedies for fraudulent claims.

In the past, insured parties had to disclose every circumstance that they knew which would influence an insurer in fixing a premium or deciding if they should underwrite a risk. This required insured parties to predict, without much guidance, which factors may affect a prudent insurer. This was also true of brokers acting on behalf of insured parties.

Part 2 of the 2015 Insurance Act has created a new ‘duty of fair presentation’ aimed at encouraging active, rather than passive, engagement by insurers as well as clarifying and specifying known or presumed to be known matters. From 12 August 2015, before entering into a contract of insurance, insured parties must disclose either:

  • every matter which they know, or ought to know, that would influence the judgement of an insurer in deciding whether to insure the risk and on what terms (similar to the current legislation); or
  • sufficient information to put an insurer on notice that it needs to make further enquiries about potentially material circumstances.
  • Insured parties will be considered to have known, or ought to have known:
  • matters that could be expected to be revealed by a reasonable search of information available to the insured party – for example, information held within an organisation or by a broker;
  • anything known by a person responsible for their insurance – for example, a broker;
  • insured organisations will also be deemed to have the knowledge of anyone who is a part of the organisation’s senior management, or who is responsible for their insurance.
  • Insurers will be considered to have known, or ought to have known:
  • matters known to individuals who participate on behalf of the insurer in deciding whether to take the risk and on what terms – for example, underwriting teams;
  • knowledge held by the insurer and readily available to the person deciding whether to take the risk;
  • matters known by an employee or agent of the insurer and which should reasonably have been passed on to the person deciding whether to take the risk.

World Soil Day 2016

At Interface we recognize the need for World Soil Day, and it compliments our business ethic and commitment to creating a greener future.

As populations grow, there is a higher demand for food and this puts pressure on the soil under our feet. Industrial growth and the dumping of toxic chemicals and waste has lead to 33% of our earth’s soil being degraded. This cannot go on.

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To find out more about World Soil Day visit the UN and the Food and Agricultural Organisation‘s dedicated pages to find out what events are in your area and how to help.

3 Ways ISO 14001 helps industry meet environment

The UN announced that 2016 is set to be the warmest year on record, so here is 3 ways your company can reduce it’s environmental impact and improve credibility…

Reduction of emissions
By implementing ISO 14001, you are committing to working with a greener ethos. The system is seamlessly combined with your company’s strategies to reduce the amount of harmful emissions you produce. This “reduce” approach comes hand-in-hand with cost reductions, possible tax and liability insurance reductions.

2. Reduction of waste

ISO 14001’s primary focus is waste reduction. By identifying and addressing areas where waste is being created, you can adjust and address this accordingly, whilst improving your green credentials within your local community and with investors too.

3. Raising awareness

By going through the process of being certified for ISO 14001, you are making a statement. You are telling your employees, customers, and potential stakeholders that you are confident in your environmental statements. You can crate environmental awareness amongst your workforce, and actively reduce the risks to employees and the environment.

ISO 14001 is an internationally recognised Standard. To learn more click here. If you are interested in being certified, would like a quote or have any general enquiries, please call 01952 288325, or fill out our enquiry form.

ISO 14001 EMS and climate control

As the UN announce that 2016 is set to be the hottest year on record, implementing an ISO 14001 Environmental Management System could not come at a better and more crucial time…

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Introducing an environmental management system will show your dedication to cutting the effects of global climate change. Whether you’re a one-person business, SME or a multi-national corporation, everyone can do their bit to change and control the energy they use and it’s impact on the planet. The focus on ISO 14001 EMS is primarily energy usage control, so you can verify your carbon footprint and reduce your greenhouse gas emissions. After implementing ISO 14001, you can confidently report your carbon footprint and create realistic goals for its reduction year-after-year.

ISO 14001 EMS can also improve your credibility as a company, the environment should be a priority, so by showing that you’ve committed to an EMS you can improve your client relationships, strengthen your ties with stakeholders, open up more markets and increase your success with winning tenders.

If that is not enough to convince you, then you should bear in mind the great savings that can be made by implementing Environmental Management Systems. Focusing on controlling your energy usage and amount of waste you produce goes hand-in-hand with costs reducing for the running of your business.

We have been certifying against the ISO 14001 EMS Standard in Shropshire, Birmingham and London this week.

ISO 14001 is an internationally recognised Standard. To learn more, or for a free quote call 01952 288325, or fill out our enquiry form.

ISO 14001 for Architects

Is ISO 14001 right for your Architectural practice?

Here at Interface NRM, we are committed to providing a bespoke service. We are proud to have worked with award-winning architects across the whole of the UK, so we can provide our expert services to architectural practices big or small!

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We understand your duty to consider the environment, not only in the running of your business, but also in the projects you undertake – having an environmental management system in place shows your dedication to reducing your company’s reliance on non-renewable sources.

So what are the benefits of ISO 14001

• Reduction in costs due to focus on renewable resources and energy management
• Increased profitability
• Compliance with RIBA Chartered Practice requirements
• Improve your company’s reputation and public image
• An advantage over your competitors when tendering for business
• Compliance with the law and environmental regulations
• Management of environmental risks

So if you want to demonstrate your commitment to running an environmentally friendly practice, and want that competitive edge against your employers, then start the ISO 14001 certification process with us today!

ISO 14001 is an internationally recognised Standard. To get ahead of the competition, call us today on 01952 288325 for a quote, or fill out our enquiry form.